State regulatory review commission approves modernized taxicab regulations

State regulatory review commission approves modernized taxicab regulations

The Independent Regulatory Review Commission Thursday unanimously approved a set of final regulations from the Public Utility Commission that are aimed at modernizing the commission’s regulation of taxicabs in order to help them better compete with the recently legalized transportation network companies such as Uber and Lyft.

 

Stemming from enabling legislation in Act 85 of 2016 and Act 164 of 2016 that allowed the temporary then permanent legalization of TNCs, the legislature tasked the PUC with promulgating new regulations as they pertain to taxicab and motor carrier companies that would allow them to better compete with TNCs, which operate on a different business model than traditional taxi companies.

Thursday, April 20, 2017/Author: Jason Gottesman
Categories: News and Views
Uber, PUC settle $11.3 million fine for $3.4 million

Uber, PUC settle $11.3 million fine for $3.4 million

The Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission announced Thursday it has settled with Uber over the $11.3 million fine it levied against the ride-sharing company last spring for illegally operating as a transportation network company in Pennsylvania without being licensed.

 

More specifically at issue, was a six-month period in 2014 during which Uber operated in Pennsylvania before it was granted an experimental license.

Thursday, April 6, 2017/Author: Jason Gottesman
Categories: News and Views
Auditor General says Act 13 impact fee needs clarification, better oversight

Auditor General says Act 13 impact fee needs clarification, better oversight

Auditor General Eugene DePasquale Tuesday released an audit of the Public Utility Commission’s oversight of Act 13 impact fee collections and noted corresponding findings demand a revision to the law to provide clarification on how the money can be spent and better oversight of how money is distributed and used.

 

Since its enactment in 2012, the impact fee has brought in around $856 million with $428 million of that split between counties and municipalities. DePasquale noted the performance audit his office recently concluded shows that local spending of the impact fee money is outside the intent of mitigating local impacts of natural gas drilling, some municipalities received overpayments, and changes to the law are needed to better support housing programs under Act 13.

Tuesday, December 6, 2016/Author: Jason Gottesman
As winter approaches, Gov. Wolf and other officials kick off LIHEAP application period

As winter approaches, Gov. Wolf and other officials kick off LIHEAP application period

November 2nd marked the first day of enrollment for the Low Income Home Energy Assistance Plan (LIHEAP), a federally funded program administered by Pennsylvania, and Gov. Tom Wolf was joined by other state officials and energy-sector partners to bring awareness to the availability of the program.

For this year’s iteration of the program, Pennsylvania will get about $182 million of $3 billion in available federal funding to administer the grant program, the individual amount of which will be determined based upon an approximated number of participants.

Last year approximately 400,000 households in Pennsylvania participated in the program.

“This is what neighbors do for neighbors,” said Gov. Wolf at a program kick-off event at Harrisburg’s Hamilton Health Center. 

Monday, November 2, 2015/Author: Jason Gottesman
Categories: News and Views
Senator wants to boost natural gas industry through infrastructure competition

Senator wants to boost natural gas industry through infrastructure competition

Sen. Stewart Greenleaf (R-Montgomery) took to the microphone Tuesday to promote his Senate Bill 953, which he said will give a boost to Pennsylvania’s natural gas industry by increasing competition by allowing companies to expand natural gas line infrastructure.

Currently, he said, half of all households and one-third of all businesses do not have access to natural gas.

“We do have some influence on what is happening in Pennsylvania, and what is happening in Pennsylvania is we have a significant number of wells…what we do have is a lack of demand and over-supply and as a result the price has gone down, the activity has slowed down,” he said.

He stated creating an infrastructure where people who want natural gas can get natural gas will reinvigorate the natural gas industry by releasing stored gas, increasing competition for customers, and driving up price, which he said will lead to more state revenues.

Tuesday, October 13, 2015/Author: Jason Gottesman
Categories: News and Views
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