Wolf vetoes Medicaid work requirements

Wolf vetoes Medicaid work requirements

Gov. Tom Wolf vetoed legislation to add work requirements for able bodied adults to receive medical assistance in Pennsylvania Friday.

The bill, HB 2138, passed the House in April and the Senate last week with ayes and nays from both parties.

It was written to exclude those under 18 and over 65, parents of kids under six, pregnant women, the disabled and some others from the requirements. But Wolf, who expanded Medicaid in his first term, said the bill would create unnecessary barriers.
Sunday, October 21, 2018/Author: Stephen Caruso
Categories: News and Views
Can't fight against the youth? House mulls bringing fresh faces to chairs, leadership

Can't fight against the youth? House mulls bringing fresh faces to chairs, leadership

Ambitious new lawmakers looking to run their own committee for years may have their dreams dashed before they even hold a gavel.

House Majority Leader Dave Reed (R-Indiana) contemplated moving a House resolution he introduced in spring to limit senior members to three sessions at the head of individual committee.

In the co-sponsor memo from the time, which also announced a redistricting commission and open primaries, Reed said his proposed changes would not change who is eligible and due for a chair, but is instead aimed to continually shake up committees.
Friday, October 19, 2018/Author: Stephen Caruso
Categories: News and Views
Though accountability concerns remain, new regulations for intellectually disabled care advance

Though accountability concerns remain, new regulations for intellectually disabled care advance

The Independent Regulatory Review Committee approved an omnibus regulation package for the care of intellectually disabled Pennsylvanians Thursday that providers and advocates said would improve on the state’s current law, even as some fretted about accountability measures.

Revealed by the Department of Human Services in 2016, the regulations will undo some 2012 vintage rules around care for people with intellectual disabilities or autism, passed with little outside input.
Thursday, October 18, 2018/Author: Stephen Caruso
Categories: News and Views
Pressure-filled week ends without Senate vote on statute of limitations reform

Pressure-filled week ends without Senate vote on statute of limitations reform

After a day of closed door caucuses, whispered rumors and fiery press conferences, statute of limitations reform went quietly into a late Harrisburg night.

That was despite enormous pressure on the Senate from victims of child abuse, Attorney General Josh Shapiro and the House throughout the week. Victims lined hallways reading the grand jury report and held personal conversations with senators, from the rank and file to leaders.

But Wednesday, the last voting day before the Nov. 6 elections, there never was a vote on SB 261 — Senate President Pro Tempore Joe Scarnati’s (R-Jefferson) own bill, amended in the House to include a civil window that he refused to back. 
Thursday, October 18, 2018/Author: Stephen Caruso
Categories: News and Views
Greenleaf's safe harbor legislation sent to Governor's desk

Greenleaf's safe harbor legislation sent to Governor's desk

After three sessions of attempts, child sex trafficking victims are one step closer to no longer having to worry that they could face prosecution for prostitution.

SB 554, sponsored by retiring Sen. Stewart Greenleaf (R-Montgomery) passed the House without a single dissenting vote Wednesday. It had previously passed the House in April unanimously.
Wednesday, October 17, 2018/Author: Stephen Caruso
Categories: News and Views
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