Would House Bill 11 save Three Mile Island? Exelon says yes, but some lawmakers aren’t so sure

Would House Bill 11 save Three Mile Island? Exelon says yes, but some lawmakers aren’t so sure

Proponents of a bill that would add nuclear power to the state’s alternative energy portfolio and provide a ratepayer-funded subsidy to nuclear power companies argue that it could save the struggling Three Mile Island power plant in Dauphin County. However, during the second House Consumer Affairs Committee hearing for House Bill 11 on Monday, some lawmakers questioned how significant the bill’s effect would be, and whether it would actually save the plant at all.   
 
The Three Mile Island generating station is scheduled to be decommissioned this fall, barring aid from state government officials. Supporters of House Bill 11 argue that the legislation is necessary not only to keeping energy costs affordable and stable, but to also save the plant from premature retirement. 
Monday, April 15, 2019/Author: Justin Sweitzer
Categories: News and Views
Stakeholders raise the alarm on nuclear power

Stakeholders raise the alarm on nuclear power

Interested stakeholders packed the Majority Caucus Room Monday for a House Consumer Affairs Committee hearing on legislation that would add nuclear energy to the state’s alternative energy portfolio, an effort that supporters believe would keep energy rates stable while saving the nuclear power industry in Pennsylvania.

Former Pennsylvania Gov. Tom Ridge was a leading voice in the hearing, offering a defense of the bill for the positive effects it could have on the environment and the Pennsylvania economy. 
Monday, April 8, 2019/Author: Justin Sweitzer
Categories: News and Views
Mackenzie’s CareerBound bill voted out of committee

Mackenzie’s CareerBound bill voted out of committee

Pennsylvania could soon have a series of workforce development programs in place to better educate students about opportunities in trade and technical careers. In the same week that a bipartisan workforce development bill package was reported out of committee and scheduled for a vote on the House floor, so too was a bill that would establish school-to-work pilot programs designed to educate students about workforce opportunities.
 
The bill sponsored by Rep. Ryan Mackenzie (R-Lehigh) — HB 425 — would establish the CareerBound program, a program which would help workforce development boards, schools and businesses develop school-to-work programs that would expose students to career and technical opportunities in high-priority occupations. The bill was successfully reported out of the House Labor and Industry Committee Wednesday, and will now await a potential House floor vote. 
Wednesday, March 13, 2019/Author: Justin Sweitzer
Categories: News and Views
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