Running as a reformer is easy, but making a difference is a separate matter

Running as a reformer is easy, but making a difference is a separate matter

Eric Epstein is no stranger to the halls of Harrisburg.

Whether handing out screeds on nuclear waste concerns or firing up outraged Pennsylvanians over midnight pay hikes, he’s been a common sight at the Capitol since the early ‘80s.

But now, with green door hangers promising gift bans, regular town halls and a salary level from decades ago, he’s trying to win his way into the building full time as a Democrat holding the “radical center” ground.

“Saturdays we’re divided by Penn State, Notre Dame, Pitt. Sundays we’re divided by Steelers and Eagles. But we come back together,” Epstein said one overcast weekend while knocking doors in Colonial Park. “We gotta do that with politics again.”
Friday, October 5, 2018/Author: Stephen Caruso
Categories: News and Views
Anti-nuclear activists raise waste concerns as atomic power works way back into political spotlight

Anti-nuclear activists raise waste concerns as atomic power works way back into political spotlight

As the 40th anniversary of the Three Mile Island meltdown approaches, local activists are launching a campaign against nuclear power in the state. Their effort opened Tuesday by questioning how to dispose of the industry’s waste.

“We still have five nuclear power plants, nine reactors and no nuclear toilet,” longtime activist Eric Epstein said.

The conversation comes as federal politicians try to restart a national conversation on where to put America’s nuclear waste, and state nuclear allies prepare to make the case that without aid, the industry could go bust in Pennsylvania.
Tuesday, October 2, 2018/Author: Stephen Caruso
Categories: News and Views
RSS