Stakeholders look to navigate potholes and boost electric vehicles in PA

Stakeholders look to navigate potholes and boost electric vehicles in PA

Once the stuff of science fiction fantasy, more Pennsylvanians than ever are opting for electric vehicles. But the commonwealth still trails its regional neighbors in adoption of the technology and state officials are working to ensure that infrastructure is growing to support the burgeoning industry.

As part as of this push, the Department of Environmental Protection rolled out the Electric Vehicle Roadmap earlier this year, which attempts to survey the current electric vehicle landscape and chart out future barriers to its proliferation.
Monday, April 1, 2019/Author: Andrew Bahl
Categories: News and Views
Effort to end general cash assistance payments to Pennsylvanians resurfaces

Effort to end general cash assistance payments to Pennsylvanians resurfaces

A fight has been reignited in the Capitol over whether the state should end making general assistance cash payments to poor Pennsylvanians, after the program was reinstated in 2018 because of a technicality found by the Pennsylvania Supreme Court.
 
House Republicans are seeking to once again end the cash assistance program, which pays out monthly stipends of approximately $205 to Pennsylvania citizens who have under $250 in countable resources. The program was eliminated in a 2012 bill signed into law by then Gov. Tom Corbett, but was reinstated once the state Supreme Court found that the General Assembly did not consider the bill the required number of times under the Pennsylvania Constitution.
Thursday, March 28, 2019/Author: Justin Sweitzer
Categories: News and Views
As lawmakers probe Wolf's teacher pay raise, long term effects worry school districts

As lawmakers probe Wolf's teacher pay raise, long term effects worry school districts

For Louis Lepley, superintendent of the North Star School District, attracting and retaining teachers in his rural Somerset County district can be a tall task.

“You can’t blame them, we’re not one of the higher paying districts in the state, and when [teachers] get that experience then we see a lot of them leave,” Lepley said. “And hats off to them--unless they have local ties, there’s a good chance they’re leaving.”

Wednesday, February 13, 2019/Author: Andrew Bahl
Categories: News and Views
Anger at turnpike tolls could increase transportation funding woes

Anger at turnpike tolls could increase transportation funding woes

From Valley Forge to Breezewood to New Stanton, truckers, commuters and joy-riders are paying six percent more out of their pocket to drive on the Pennsylvania Turnpike.

The increase, effective January 6, isn’t just bothering motorists, it’s also caught the ire of the state’s chief executive, Gov. Tom Wolf.

“People using the turnpike are paying too much,” Wolf said in a late 2018 interview with KDKA Radio. “The turnpike is driving business away.”

The toll increase, a product of a decade old state law, is also driving a wedge between trucking groups that feel hosed by excessive rates and mass transit advocates who see them as essential to a millennial economy.
Thursday, January 10, 2019/Author: Stephany Dugan
Categories: News and Views
Saylor questions gloomy IFO projections, pushes for government “within its means” for 2019 budget

Saylor questions gloomy IFO projections, pushes for government “within its means” for 2019 budget

In a statement Monday, House Appropriations Chair Stan Saylor (R-York) pointed to rosy revenue numbers, a projected surplus from Gov. Tom Wolf’s administration and previous spending overestimates from the state Independent Fiscal Office in calling for no new taxes.

“As we head into the new legislative session, the focus of the House Republican Caucus will be on creating a budget that does not rely on new taxes or fees and that supports job creation,” Saylor said in the statement.

Monday, December 17, 2018/Author: Stephen Caruso
Categories: News and Views
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