A Detailed History of the Statewide Radio System

A Detailed History of the Statewide Radio System

In 1996, Gov. Tom Ridge signed Act 148 authorizing funding of $179 million for the creation of the statewide radio system known as PA-STARNet, with the goal of designing a radio system through which each state agency would be able to communicate.

 

It is now two decades later and the system, considered unreliable by its users, has cost the Commonwealth an estimated $810 million and the Pennsylvania State Police (PSP) are asking for more time and more money to finally create a system that will live up to its expectations.

With the safety of the Commonwealth’s first responders at risk as well as that of Pennsylvania citizens, The PLS Reporter has traced the history of this issue to determine what has gone wrong and why the system has continuously been plagued with problems. 

Thursday, July 13, 2017/Author: Nicole Trayer
Categories: Features
Pennsylvania State Police lacks complement, funding while lawmakers aim to increase State Police coverage

Pennsylvania State Police lacks complement, funding while lawmakers aim to increase State Police coverage

The Senate Law and Justice committee held a hearing Tuesday to analyze Senate Bill 258 which would allow the contracting of state police for local municipality, borough, or township coverage. The prime sponsor of the bill is Senator Kim Ward (R-Westmoreland).

Senate Bill 258 would not require all municipalities to engage in a contractual agreement with the Pennsylvania State Police, but rather be an alternative option for increased safety in the municipality. The contract would have a minimum payment of $65 an hour to have a State Police Trooper in a municipality.

Tuesday, May 23, 2017/Author: Kyle Maguire
Categories: News and Views
Judiciary Committee examines use of body cameras by police

Judiciary Committee examines use of body cameras by police

The House Judiciary Committee met in Latrobe at St. Vincent College on Wednesday to discuss the current practices and possible changes regarding the use of body cameras by police.

“This is a timely subject,” said Chairman Ron Marsico (R-Dauphin) in his opening remarks. “Just a few years ago the Commonwealth authorized the use of police body cameras to enhance our efforts of public safety and officer safety as well. We hope to promote transparency and in doing so, we hope to see better interactions between citizens and police.”

As the law sits right now, Act 9 or the Wiretap Act allows police officers on duty to use body cameras to record communications with people they encounter. However, they must first tell those they encounter they are being recorded when “reasonably practical” and are also not allowed to use body-worn cameras inside a residence.
Thursday, August 11, 2016/Author: Alanna Koll
Categories: Pittsburgh
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