Pittsburgh City Council passes inclusionary zoning legislation

Pittsburgh City Council passes inclusionary zoning legislation

To the glee of affordable housing advocates and chagrin of some real estate developers, Pittsburgh City Council passed an ordinance requiring developers to allocate ten percent of any Lawrenceville project featuring 20 units or more for affordable housing by an 8-0 vote on Wednesday. 

“This is really a historic moment, this is one of the major items that was suggested by our affordable housing task force and I think that we were able to apply the right tool to the right neighborhood needs,” Gross said. 
Thursday, July 25, 2019/Author: Atiya Irvin-Mitchell
Categories: News and Views
Pittsburgh residents support Pittsburgh City Council Inclusionary zoning legislation

Pittsburgh residents support Pittsburgh City Council Inclusionary zoning legislation

For years as prices have gone up, longtime, lower-income residents have been forced out in the wake of redevelopment. From tax credits to a slew of initiatives from the Housing Opportunity Fund, in Pittsburgh, elected officials and affordable housing advocates alike have struggled to quell displacement.

One of the methods used in combating the consequences of gentrification is inclusionary zoning. In the form of legislation sponsored by Pittsburgh City Councilwoman Deb Gross (D-District 7), in Lawrenceville, a neighborhood that has become synonymous with gentrification, housing developers would soon be required to set aside ten percent of affordable housing in any project consisting of at least 20 units.

Wednesday, July 17, 2019/Author: Atiya Irvin-Mitchell
Categories: Pittsburgh
Pittsburgh Planning Commission recommends inclusionary zoning legislation

Pittsburgh Planning Commission recommends inclusionary zoning legislation

After a two hours of testimony from Lawrenceville residents, activists, and the occasional elected official, the Pittsburgh Planning Commission unanimously recommended that Pittsburgh City Council approve proposed legislation for inclusionary zoning on Tuesday.

In recent years areas of Pittsburgh such as Lawrenceville have seen their share of redevelopment. The downside has often been as the cost of living rises, older and less well-off residents have been forced to leave. To confront displacement, Pittsburgh City councilwoman Deb Gross (D-District 7) proposed an inclusionary zoning measure that would require setting aside 10 percent of affordable housing in any project comprised of 20 units.

Wednesday, April 24, 2019/Author: Atiya Irvin-Mitchell
Categories: Pittsburgh
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