Scarnati drops opposition to seating Williams on swearing in day, but keeps her residency an open question

Scarnati drops opposition to seating Williams on swearing in day, but keeps her residency an open question

A top Senate Republican said in a statement Friday he was dropping his opposition to the seating of a Democratic Senator-elect, having previously questioned the residency requirement.

Senate President Pro Tempore Joe Scarnati (R-Jefferson) said in a release that he recommends his caucus seat Lindsey Williams as the elected Senator of the north Pittsburgh suburban 38th District. However, he left open reexamining her residency if new documentation emerged.

Williams, a teachers’ union official, defeated Jeremy Shaffer, a local township commissioner, for the seat formerly held by Sen. Randy Vulakovich (R-Allegheny). Shaffer bested Vulakovich in the May primary. Williams went on to win the general by 800 votes.
Friday, December 28, 2018/Author: Stephen Caruso
Categories: News and Views
Scarnati asks Williams for proof of residency ahead of swearing in

Scarnati asks Williams for proof of residency ahead of swearing in

A letter from the Senate’s highest ranking Republican laid out the process for a recent election winner to prove she meets the state’s residency requirement.

First reported by WESA, Senate President Pro Tempore Joe Scarnati, (R-Jefferson) sent a letter to Senator-elect Lindsey Williams (D-Allegheny) Thursday that asked Williams to provide a driver’s license, employment contracts, leases, tax documents and anything else to prove she was a resident of Pennsylvania in time for her to stand on the November 2018 ballot.

Friday, November 30, 2018/Author: Stephen Caruso
Categories: News and Views

Tweets of the Week - June 11, 2018

Check out the week as described by Tweets from lawmakers, influencers, and others around Pennsylvania state government.

Friday, June 15, 2018/Author: Mike Howells
Categories: Features
Primary season brings bevy of outsiders into system for chance in November

Primary season brings bevy of outsiders into system for chance in November

A 20-year-old college student, a few mothers who want to shake things up, and a lot of people who brand themselves as “not a politician” are just a few of the hundreds of candidates competing next Tuesday just to earn their place on the November midterm ballot.

Below, The PLS Reporter breaks out a few races to watch on May 15.

Friday, May 11, 2018/Author: The PLS Reporter
RSS